Using Your Oven As A BBQ Grill

Raw Steak on a GrillThe weather during British summer time can be somewhat unpredictable, so it’s handy to know that even when it starts to pour down, you can take the party indoors and use the oven to grill your food.

Whilst cooking indoors might not be quite as attractive as barbecuing your food out in the sun, it’s often a necessity due to weather constraints. It’s also great to have that extra grill available if you’ve got no space left on the BBQ. The oven essentially acts as an indoor gas grill.

Similarities

Your domestic oven may not deliver that much sought-after charcoal flavour that traditional BBQs do, but it does provide you with a versatile and easy to set-up method of enjoying grilled food. Yes they may look completely different, but your kitchen’s oven actually shares a lot in common with the outdoor BBQ. Both your BBQ and your oven’s grill use intense heat to grill foods. Both appliances require the same careful attention from a watchful eye to avoid over-cooking and burning the food. Perhaps most importantly though, they are both capable of creating tantalising chargrilled food.

Differences

That being said, there are obviously a few major differences between a BBQ grill and an oven grill, the major one being that your oven acts as a thermostat with which you can control the cooking temperature.

Whilst gas grills also possess this feature, charcoal grills do not, which means the temperature is much harder to control. Whilst the ability to control the temperature your food cooks at is often a blessing, it can sometimes be a curse.

Typical ovens turn off once they’ve reached their optimal temperature, which is usually past 250oC. This will leave any food inside the oven cooking in its own steam, which is something you really don’t want to happen when you’re grilling. You want your food to be under constant heat, direct from the grill.Inside of an oven

In order to keep your oven’s grill burning, keep the oven door slightly open. This promotes good airflow, allowing the heat to escape and keeping the oven from reaching its highest temperature and shutting down. This means that your food will burn on the grill instead of baking in the oven.

Using A Grill Pan

Just like when you’re grilling outside, you’ll want all the grease and fat from the food to be able to drip away, but you don’t want to get your oven too dirty. This is why you should always use a grilling pan.

A nice cast iron grill pan will ensure the heat spreads evenly and will last a lifetime (and some) if cared for properly. Preheat the grill pan before you put any food on it so you get a nice searing on the meat’s surface.

Food Safety

Since you’re going to be cooking via direct heat you don’t actually have to worry about preheating the oven itself when you’re grilling.

You should always keep a watchful eye on your food whenever you cook, and this applies tenfold when grilling. Foods can easily burn and even catch fire if not monitored properly, so be sure to stay close to your oven grill and make sure you don’t overcook anything.

Don’t assume that because your oven is open it will take longer to cook; you can still grill food very quickly, but before you eat anything you should always check that it’s cooked through thoroughly. As long as you pay attention to your food you shouldn’t run into any problems.

If you find your oven smoking a lot whenever you turn the grill on then it’s probably due to a build-up of grease and grime, and it’s about time you had your appliance cleaned. Don’t attempt to take anything apart and clean it yourself, especially when Ovenu have friendly, fully trained technicians on-hand that can do the job for you.

Contact Ovenu today to discover how we can leave your grill looking like-new.

Image Credits:

Raw steak on a grill via BigStock

The inside of a stove via BigStock